Sometimes I just make stuff up.

seahorseboy:

pretty much the entire meaning of my url

seahorseboy:

pretty much the entire meaning of my url

When I was a student at Cambridge I remember an anthropology professor holding up a picture of a bone with 28 incisions carved in it. “This is often considered to be man’s first attempt at a calendar” she explained. She paused as we dutifully wrote this down. ‘My question to you is this – what man needs to mark 28 days? I would suggest to you that this is woman’s first attempt at a calendar.’

It was a moment that changed my life. In that second I stopped to question almost everything I had been taught about the past. How often had I overlooked women’s contributions?

myvegansensesaretingling:

can we take a moment of silence to just appreciate how fucking gorgeous the bi pride colors are?

I mean

image

look

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at

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this

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(sourced as accurately as possible, where appropriate)

Birds born in a cage think flying is an illness.

Alejandro Jodorowsky (via torturegardens)

(Source: ameliacarina)

dearnonacepeople:

Reblog this if you’re asexual, bisexual, pansexual, or transgender, or are in a sexuality/gender identity that is often considered a special snowflake group. This is a message to you shitheads out there, we’re not made up, we are amazing, we are real!

-Ezzy

sixpenceee:

sixpenceee:

problemedic:

plightofthevalkyries:

sixpenceee:

deucelooselyproductions:

sixpenceee:

The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that psychiatrists cannot reliably tell the difference between people who are mentally stable and those who are mentally unstable.

In 1970, 8 mentally stable people were granted admission into 12 different hospitals. They all told the same story of how they would hear a voice inside their head, it was unclear but often said “empty”, “hollow” and “thud”. 

Right after they were admitted, the patients stopped showing any signs of abnormality. They took part in activities and talked to faculty and other patients as they would normally. 

None of the psychiatrists ever stopped to say “I think they are getting better” or “they seem absolutely fine now” In fact, nurses and psychiatrists took normal activity such as walking or writing and attempted to represent it as a form of pathological behavior. 

For example, staff would point to patients waiting outside the lunchroom as a form of oral-acquisitive syndrome, when really they were just bored and were anticipating their meal. 

It’s interesting to note that even though staff didn’t recognize that these people were completely fine, patients recognized that they didn’t seem to have any problems.

This study highlights how powerful labels can be.

SOURCE & MORE INFORMATION

EVIL EXPERIMENT

Wow…this also potentially bespeaks how the people who are charged with making these patients better are only trying to create terminology and atmosphere that keep them institutionalized.
That’s pretty disturbing.

To anyone saying “well they said they heard voices obviously the doctors are going to look at them with a weary eye”

You missed the point.

They were supposed to detect the patients getting better and instead of being able to tell that, they took any action that the patients performed and totally distorted it and blew it to epic proportions to make them seem completely and utterly abnormal to a point where the patients were institutionalized for months. 

Also, sixpenceee, you missed the second part to this experiment - equally chilling, in my opinion. One hospital’s administration was angered by Rosenhan’s experiment, and challenged him to send impostor patients - mentally stable people masquerading as mentally unstable people - to their facilities. Their staff would then turn those pseudopatients away. Long story short, Rosenhan OK’d this part of the experiment. 193 people went to that hospital in that experiment period looking for help. They flagged 41 people as impostors and had doubts about another 42.

Rosenhan sent no one.

The staff of this hospital flagged impostor patients where none had existed.

That’s really worrying…

This is terrifying 

This was conducted in 1970, so I wonder how much has changed since then

ninjasexfarty:

Important, always-relevant comic done by the wonderful Ursa Eyer.

princessblogonoke:

Anxiety & Helping Someone Cope. 
I didn’t want to make it overwhelming or too long remember, so I kept it to the main points that benefit me greatly when I’m experiencing an attack.
40 million of Americans alone suffer with anxiety; it’s a horrid feeling when you know someone just wants to help you but you cannot even construct a simple sentence at the time, so please share this in hope that it benefits even just 1 person. Muchos love. 

I spent all this time checking my privilege and becoming a good cis ally now I’m questioning my gender identity and I’m like “NOOOO did I do all that work for nothing?”. 

worthless-art:

Map of Our Tribal Nations

Our Own Names and Original Locations

http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2014/06/24/323665644/the-map-of-native-american-tribes-youve-never-seen-before

Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has pinpointed the locations and original names of hundreds of American Indian nations before their first contact with Europeans.

As a teenager, Carapella says he could never get his hands on a continental U.S. map like this, depicting more than 600 tribes — many now forgotten and lost to history. Now, the 34-year-old designs and sells maps as large as 3 by 4 feet with the names of tribes hovering over land they once occupied.

"I think a lot of people get blown away by, ‘Wow, there were a lot of tribes, and they covered the whole country!’ You know, this is Indian land," says Carapella, who calls himself a "mixed-blood Cherokee" and lives in a ranch house within the jurisdiction of the Cherokee Nation.

For more than a decade, he consulted history books and library archives, called up tribal members and visited reservations as part of research for his map project, which began as pencil-marked poster boards on his bedroom wall. So far, he has designed maps of the continental U.S., Canada and Mexico. A map of Alaska is currently in the works.

What makes Carapella’s maps distinctive is their display of both the original and commonly known names of Native American tribes, according to Doug Herman, senior geographer at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

"You can look at [Carapella’s] map, and you can sort of get it immediately," Herman says. "This is Indian Country, and it’s not the Indian Country that I thought it was because all these names are different."

He adds that some Native American groups got stuck with names chosen arbitrarily by European settlers. They were often derogatory names other tribes used to describe their rivals. For example, “Comanche” is derived from a word in Ute meaning “anyone who wants to fight me all the time,” according to the Encyclopaedia Britannica.

"It’s like having a map of North America where the United States is labeled ‘gringos’ and Mexico is labeled ‘wetbacks,’ " Herman says. "Naming is an exercise in power. Whether you’re naming places or naming peoples, you are therefore asserting a power of sort of establishing what is reality and what is not."

Look at a map of Native American territory today, and you’ll see tiny islands of reservation and trust land engulfed by acres upon acres ceded by treaty or taken by force. Carapella’s maps serve as a reminder that the population of the American countryside stretches back long before 1776 and 1492.

Carapella describes himself as a former “radical youngster” who used to lead protests against Columbus Day observances and supported other Native American causes. He says he now sees his mapmaking as another way to change perceptions in the U.S.

"This isn’t really a protest," he explains. "But it’s a way to convey the truth in a different way."

somersault1824:

Baby bat in a Batman sock, used to protect his injured wing. http://ift.tt/1zRrUzb

somersault1824:

Baby bat in a Batman sock, used to protect his injured wing. http://ift.tt/1zRrUzb

harmonyinkpress:

I’m putting these up again because apparently I failed horribly at clicking earlier tonight. And at noticing I failed horribly at clicking. And two of the banners we made got left out. Sorry!

So, like I said in the original post, I know I mentioned that we were working on a campaign to increase the variety of submissions we get.

Well, here is the first round of graphics. I know this doesn’t cover everything (even when you consider we deliberately left gay out because we have close to 70% gay stories), but it’s a start.

Feedback is welcome. If there’s an orientation/identity you’d like us to include in our next round, please let me know. We truly want to publish books that represent the whole rainbow spectrum, and we want to spread around graphics and posters that represent that.

For more details, see our submission guidelines.

tlatollotl:

In 1889, Mexican archaeologist Leopoldo Batres was contacted about the find of a “Toltec Mummy” in a cave near Santa María Camotlán, Oaxaca. Batres published an obscure illustrated paper on the discovery later that year, which partially depicted the geometric forearm tattoos of the individual. Some years later, the mummy found its way to the Trocadéro Ethnographic Museum in Paris.

Over the course of the following 123 years, the female mummy lay largely forgotten until 2012 when detailed studies of her body were finally conducted. Today, the mummy is housed in the collections of the Museé du quai Branly in Paris.

Remarkably, radiocarbon dating has shown that this individual dates to 250 A.D. Her arm tattoos are now known to be more extensive and complex that previously thought and are possibly related to Later Oaxacan (“Mixteca-Puebla”) scribal traditions. The “Toltec Mummy” provides the earliest firm evidence of tattooing in Mexico.

Hopefully additional studies (e.g., infrared photography, tattoo pigment research) of this unique individual will reveal more clues to the meanings behind her exquisite zoomorphic tattoos.